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Memorial photographs from 90 Norfolk Cemeteries

Deceased Online is excited to announce the beginning of a large project with the release of memorial photographs from 90 Norfolk cemeteries on the database 


Above: headstones around the ruins of a church at Tunstall

Deceased Online has this week begun uploading images to its website from a vast photography collection of Norfolk cemeteries taken by Norfolk resident, Louise Cocker

The first set of images includes images from 90 cemeteries and churchyards. This is a total of over 10,000 photographs. The photographs exist as a valuable record of headstones and memorials that are constantly being eroded by weather and time.

Louise has been photographing the headstones and memorials of Norfolk with her mother, Angela, since 2009. She told us, "It's something I am very passionate about as I think it is important for future generations to be able to see where their ancestors are buried." 


Above: many Victorian headstones were beautifully elaborate

Dating from the 17th century, the collection comprises thousands of photographs of headstones, memorials, plaques, and war dedications. Many of the older inscriptions contain a lot of information valuable to historians and family researchers, such as the lineage and names of surviving children of the deceased:

Here under resteth the body of ye worthy and religious lady Elizabeth Pettus
daughter of Sir Thomas Pettus of Aswelthorpe, Knight, and of Elizabeth
one of ye daughters and coheires of Sir Nathaniel Bacon of Stifkay, Knight, 
and late wife of Sir Thomas Pettus of Rackheath, Baronett, who deceased Jan:28:1653, 
and left 3 surviving sonnes Thomas, Augustine, and John.

As the headstones used as the basis for this collection date back centuries and many have eroded over time, parts can be difficult to transcribe. Inscriptions on some of these monuments may be illegible, or only readable in part. Thus Deceased Online recommends searching the database using a percentage symbol (%) in place of a surname or forename - this will bring up all names, including those recorded as unreadable.

The full list of the first 90 Norfolk cemeteries to be uploaded is as follows:


Cemetery NameNumber of Images
Alby131
Attlebridge95
Aylmerton326
Baconsthorpe201
Bagthorpe52
Bale cemetery179
Banningham199
Bawdeswell174
Beeston St Lawrence115
Belaugh Cemetery24
Bessingham80
Billingford (Nr Dereham)198
Billockby37
Blickling Cemetery390
Booton129
Bradfield123
Brampton149
Brandiston67
Brinningham170
Brisley227
Burgh Castle Cemetery76
Burgh Near Aylesham87
Colby200
Colney Norwich138
Cromer Cemetery196
Docking cemetery31
B27
Dunton84
East Rudsham111
Felbrigg137
Fulmodeston76
Gately72
Glandford86
Great Hautbois (St Theobald)87
Gunton57
Haveringland113
Hempstead nr Holt143
Hoe136
Houghton St Giles106
Ingworth146
Little Barningham87
Little Witchingham23
Mannington16
Metton81
Morton76
Newton by Castle Acre79
North Barsham66
North Walsham Quakers Cemetery22
Old Catton Cemetery133
Oulton224
Oxnead65
Oxwick27
Plumstead96
RAF Coltishall222
Reepham & Kerdiston Cemetery83
Ridlington125
Rougham186
Runhall118
Salle190
Sco Ruston55
Sharrington134
Sherford82
Smallburgh229
Southwood13
St Faiths cemetery213
Stanfield150
Stibbard252
Stody113
Sustead112
Swafield139
Swannington172
Tatterford101
Themelthorpe52
Thurgarton125
Thurning152
Thursford74
Thuxton104
Thwaite104
Tunstall Ruins36
Tuttington141
Walsingham Guild of All Souls11
Walsingham Methodist9
Walsingham Roman Catholic Shrine139
Walsingham Shrine of Our Lady93
Walsingham The Annunciation12
Warham All Saints158
Warham St Mary154
Waterden39
Welbourne190
West Barsham66
West Beckham (Ruins)113
Wood Dalling241


Do you have ancestors buried in a Norfolk churchyard? We would love to hear about your East Anglian forebears, their lives, occupations and families. Do let us know about them in the Comments Box below or on our Facebook and Twitter pages.

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